On & Off the Grid

For those of you who are in the city—especially if you work in midtown—I recommend you drop by the Lobby Gallery of the Durst Organization at 1155 6th Avenue (@ 45th St.) for Artisté Florenza’s show, On & Off the Grid. It’s a chance to see a nice representation of her work (25 paintings!) in a spacious, well-lit venue. It’s the largest showing of her work that I’ve seen and it’s nice to see so many of her pieces gathered in one space.

The Artisté has been kind enough to act a docent for 7-Year Old Daughter and I at MoMA and when I mentioned the show to Daughter she insisted on going, so I took her to the opening. It was her first! I didn’t allow her to sample the wine—just a few grapes and some cheese. She was VERY excited and felt a special thrill because she knows the artist personally.

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Artisté Florenza loves architecture. Many of the buildings she has honored, especially some in Long Island City where her studio is located, have since been demolished. Developers all over Manhattan are begging her not to paint their buildings.

That’s a little joke.

Here, Daughter is studying a painting of the Metropolitan Life Building in Madison Square Park. A long time ago, I briefly worked for a design firm run by a crazy husband/wife team whose offices were in the crown of this building (the part bathed in yellow light).

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Artisté Florenza has painted a series of buildings that are reflected in the glass of an adjacent building. The paintings are effective and a bit eerie.

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The show runs through September 18th.

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8 thoughts on “On & Off the Grid

  1. I think I have the best mom in the world. My childhood is peppered with memories of her taking me to cultural events and nurturing my interest with sincere questions about what I thought about all I saw. Your daughters will remember this stuff. x

  2. first, i have to agree with ellie. my 4 are now all in their 30’s and each one has told us how much they now value all those trips to museums, galleries, etc. when they were young. we were fortunate enough to have traveled extensively when they were young, so it was just part of growing up and became part of their “things you do whenever you can” in life. well done, sir & mrs. wife!ok, now i can tell YOU just how jealous i am again! ;~D i think it’s time for a sanity trip to a big city! xoxox

  3. Neat. I remember when you posted some of the artist’s works previously.I think it’s pretty cool that, at seven, your daughter has developed this level of awareness and appreciation.Of course, that may make for significant challenges when she hits her teens, but that’s no reason to inhibit her now.

  4. Hello, I often pop over to your great blog from Jimmy B’s. I too have grown-up kids who started going to museums and galleries from a young age. How lovely that your daughter actually knows the artist.

  5. Ellie: I hope it gets under her skin. Soon, I’ll start on the 3-Year Old.Sav: Only a fool would live this close and not take advantage of it.HIF: And enjoyed both in equal measures. Rob: I’m spinning my web for as long as I can. It won’t last forever. Daisy: She’s a girly girl and likes to accessorize. CRG: Welcome! We love lurkers at the Banishment.

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